TIMOTHY

Painful lessons are usually doorways to new opportunities. Even the apostle Paul had much to learn.  Shortly after his disappointing experience with John Mark, Paul recruited another eager young man, Timothy to be his assistant.  Paul’s intense personality may have been too much for John Mark to handle.  It could easily have created the same problem for Timothy.  But Paul seems to have learned a lesson in patience from his old friend Barnabas.  As a result, Timothy became a “son” to Paul.

Timothy probably became a Christian after Paul’s first missionary visit to Lystra (Acts 16:1-5). Timothy already had solid Jewish training in the Scriptures from his mother and grandmother.  By Paul’s second visit, Timothy had grown into a respected disciple of Jesus.  He did not hesitate to join Paul and Silas on their journey.  His willingness to be circumcised as an adult is clearly a mark of his commitment.  (Timothy’s mixed Greek/Jewish background could have created problems on their missionary journeys, because many of their audiences would be made up of Jews who were concerned about the strict keeping of this tradition.  Timothy’s submission to the rite of circumcision helped to avoid that potential problem.)

Beyond the tensions created by his mixed racial background, Timothy seemed to struggle with a naturally timid character and a sensitivity to his youthfulness. Unfortunately, many who share Timothy’s character traits are quickly written off as too great a risk to deserve much responsibility.  By God’s grace, Paul saw great potential in Timothy.  Paul demonstrated his confidence in Timothy by entrusting him with important responsibilities.  Paul sent Timothy as his personal representative to Corinth during a particularly tense time (1 Corinthians 4:14-17).  Although Timothy was apparently ineffective in that difficult mission, Paul did not give up on him.  Timothy continued to travel with Paul.

Our last pictures of Timothy come from the most personal letters in the New Testament: 1 and 2 Timothy. The aging apostle Paul was near the end of his life, but his burning desire to continue his mission had not dimmed.  Paul was writing to one of his closest friends – – they had travelled, suffered, cried, and laughed together.  They shared the intense joy of seeing people respond to the good news and the agonies of seeing the gospel rejected and distorted.  Paul left Timothy in Ehpesus to oversee the young church there (1 Timothy 1:3, 4).  He wrote to encourage Timothy and give him needed direction.  These letters have provided comfort and help to countless other “Timothys” through the years.  When you face a challenge that seems beyond your abilities, read 1 and 2 Timothy, and remember that others have shared your experience.

Strengths and accomplishments:

  • Became a believer after Paul’s first missionary journey and joined him for his other two journeys
  • Was a respected Christian in his home town
  • Was Paul’s special representative on several occasions
  • Received two personal letters from Paul
  • Probably knew Paul better than any other person, becoming like a son to Paul

Weaknesses and mistakes:

  • Struggled with a timid and reserved nature
  • Allowed others to look down on his youthfulness
  • Was apparently unable to correct some of the problems in the church at Corinth when Paul sent him there

Lessons from his life:

  • Youthfulness should not be an excuse for ineffectiveness
  • Our inadequacies and inabilities should not keep us from being available to God

Vital statistics:

  • Where: Lystra
  • Occupations: Missionary, pastor
  • Relatives: Mother: Eunice. Grandmother: Lois, Greek father
  • Contemporaries: Paul, Silas, Luke, Mark, Peter, Barnabas

Key verses: “I have no-one else like him [Timothy], who takes a genuine interest in your welfare. For everyone looks out for his own interests, not those of Jesus Christ.  But you know that Timothy has proved himself, because as a son with his father he has served with me in the work of the gospel” (Philippians 2:20-22).

Timothy’s story is told in Acts, starting in chapter 16. He is also mentioned in Romans 16:21; 1 Corinthians 4:17; 16:10, 11; 2 Corinthians 1:1, 19; Philippians 1:1; 2:19-23; Colossians 1:1; 1 Thessalonians 1:1-10; 2:3, 4; 3:2-6; 1 and 2 Timothy; Philemon 1; Hebrews 13:23.

©KingsWay 1973.

 

 

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